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By On This Day in NYC's History

THE HARLEM RIOT OF 1943 TOOK PLACE

On August 1st, 1943: The Harlem Riot of 1943 ensued. The uproar was precipitated by the shooting of an African-American soldier, Robert Bandy, by a white policeman. Bandy had tried to intervene when this member of the NYPD struck a black woman who was being arrested for disturbing the peace at the Braddock Hotel in Harlem, and when he did, the situation rapidly intensified; the police officer drew his weapon and shot Bandy in the shoulder. Thankfully, Bandy’s wound was not serious; however, he was, of course, taken to a nearby hospital, where crowds drew quickly. Then, when an onlooker fallaciously shouted that an African-American soldier had been shot and killed, a riot arose. The rioters, mostly black, destroyed property and looted white-owned businesses throughout Harlem, causing Mayor LaGuardia to order a force of 6,600 city police, military police, and civil patrolmen (along with 8,000 State Guardsmen and 1,500 civilian volunteers) to restore order. The damage done by the riot was considerable; total property damage neared five million dollars, six people were killed, 400 were injured, and 500 were arrested.

Image Courtesy of the Village Voice

Image Courtesy of the Village Voice

REGGIE JACKSON WAS INDUCTED INTO THE HALL OF FAME

On August 1st, 1993: Baseball great Reggie Jackson was inducted into the Hall of Fame and enshrined as a member of the New York Yankees. Nearly 10,000 fans and 38 living Hall of Famers watched as Mr. October–the nickname given to Jackson for his postseason performance (18 home runs, an added 48 RBI’S and a .537 slugging percentage in 77 career playoff games)–become the 216th Hall of Famer.

BORN ON THIS DAY: DOM DELUISE

On August 1st, 1933: Actor, comedian, and Brooklynite Dom DeLuise was born. His first acting credit was as a regular performer on CBS’s hour-long variety show The Entertainers in the mid ’60s. Then, in the ‘70s and ‘80s, he went on to star alongside the great Burt Reynolds; the two appeared in film classics like The Cannonball Run, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and The End. However, DeLuise was perhaps best known as a regular in Mel Brooks’ films, making cameos in The Twelve Chairs, Silent Movie, (our personal favorite) Spaceballs, and many more. After a long and prosperous career as one of America’s favorite funny men, DeLuise died on May 4, 2009.

Featured Image Courtesy of Flickr